Treasure Island Hunters Point Shipyard ranked 25 worst site by the EPA

This is the original National Priorities list ranked by worst to first in classes. Treasure Island Hunters Point Annex is ranked in the 5th class, 25 on this list of names of sites. Note equal to the Savannah River Plant that has to this day, radioactive waste in barrels on the site. It is also worse than a Hanford site.

Fact Book: National Priorities List Under the Original Hazard Ranking System, 1981-1991, United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Emergency and Remedial Response. Washington, DC: Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1993. pp. 49-51
Continue reading “Treasure Island Hunters Point Shipyard ranked 25 worst site by the EPA”

EARTHDAY 2021 PROTEST SAN FRANCISCO video

These are the people I am fighting for to publish the Navy reports on my Treasure Island website and on this Disaster Area website documenting the Navy’s contamination of Hunters Point shipyard by the US Navy’s Radiological Defense Laboratory based at Hunters Point and at Treasure Island, the Navy’s Atomic, Biological and Chemical Warfare Training Center.

And if you want a sample of the Navy’s own sources, of what they dumped and polluted at Hunters Point Shipyard, here is their Health and Safety report from 1960 documenting the exposures by building number and listing the radiological accidents just for 1960
U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory., Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. (1961). Radiological safety at USNRDL: annual progress report health physics division ; 1 January to 31 December 1960. San Francisco, California: U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. Note: This text is searchable on that website

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13577 Radiation Film Badges were used at Hunters Point Shipyard in 1960

In 1960 the US Naval Radiological Defense Lab developed 2655 Radiation Measuring Film Badges for Treasure Island and 12,688 for the US Naval Radiological Defense Lab at Hunters Point Shipyard along with 889 for Hunters Point Shipyard separate from the Defense Lab. These badges are dosimeters that measure how much radiation a person was exposed to during a period of time and they were collected from all over the Bay Area to be developed and analyzed at the Defense Lab for the year of 1960.

U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory., Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. (1961). Radiological safety at USNRDL: annual progress report health physics division ; 1 January to 31 December 1960. San Francisco, California: U.S. Naval Radiological Defense Laboratory. p 20

This document is a who’s who of radiological exposure just for one year at the US Navy’s Radiological Defense Laboratory and I highly recommend it as reading material to give you a look into the radiation experiments they conducted on the shipyard (including building numbers) and all throughout the Bay Area, including downtown San Francisco!

The presence of radiation badges means each time a human being was exposed to radiation over the course of an experiment or regular monitoring of radiation exposure on site. A very frequent and robust radiological contaminations were taking place at the Shipyard and Treasure Island in 1960.

Camp Parks in Dublin CA was the field station for the Lab where they conducted radiological tests on the base while military personnel worked and lived on the base. These experiments included using the gymnasium to rain down radioactive isotopes to determine its effects on roof structures and that gymnasium was then “cleaned up” and was used by the Navy and then the Air Force when they took over the base and as recently as last year by private entities before it was torn down. Stanford Research did a lot of radiological work at Camp Parks and it is clear they had many nuclear accidents reported in this report from 1960.

They did this for other locations listed below:

Dosimeter films developed at the USNRDL 1960
NRDLFilm ProcessedTotals
Laboratory personnel7684
Laboratory visitors1619
Environmental monitoring471
Calibration film900
Special films for Nucleonics Div.109
Special films for Bio-Med Div.5
Special films for Health Physics Div.3
RadCon Team film (controls)11
Special test exposures163
Camp Parks Personnel and visitors1361
Camp Parks Environmental monitoring362
12688Subtotal
Outside Activities
San Francisco Naval Shipyard889
Treasure Island Inspector of Navy Material523
Treasure Island Radiac Maintenance School and Dispensary2122
Port Chicago958
NAS Moffett Field97
USN Dispensary, 50 Fell St. , San Francisco56
DPWO, 12ND30
NSC, Oakland (Naval Supply Center, Oakland)200
USS HANCOCK51
NAS Fallon. Nevada67
USNH, Oakland (US Naval Hospital Oakland)21
MSTS, San Francisco24
NAD, Hawthorne, Nevada17
U. S. Coast Guard5
5060Subtotal
17748Total

Lawsuit Aims to Cover San Fran Police Dept. Employees Allegedly Exposed to Radioactive Material at Hunters Point Naval Shipyard

ClassAction.org has this announcement of the Lawsuit against the Navy for lying to the city saying the area was safe when Police Department rented out buildings at Hunters Point Shipyard. A copy of the complaint is at this address: https://www.classaction.org/news/lawsuit-aims-to-cover-san-fran-police-dept.-employees-allegedly-exposed-to-radioactive-material-at-hunters-point-naval-shipyard

The actual complaint: https://www.classaction.org/media/abbey-et-al-v-united-states-of-america-et-al.pdf
Note I will be adding content to this article.

The Uptake by Plants of Plutonium and Some Products of Nuclear Fission Adsorbed on Soil Colloids

[Editors note: plants absorb contaminants, so in radiological areas it is important to not landscape them, that by doing so spreads the radition or contaminates into the ecosystemand food chain. Extensive testing in this area was extensively conducted to determine the extent of the contamination. ]

“It has been found that barley and pea plants take up the fission elements Y (yttrium), Ce (cerium), Zr (zirconium) + Cb (columbium), Te (tellurium), Sr (strontium), and the three valence states of Pu (plutonium), even when these elements are present in trace amounts on the surfaces of clay or soil particles. For all the elements tested, the greatest fixation is in or on the roots. With the exception of Sr, translocation occurs only to a limited extent. The trans- location of Sr is relatively quite large. Activity levels of 0.1 microcuries per gram of soil are sufficient to cause very pronounced injury over a three-months period. (Technical Information Pilot, Sc. and Technol. Proj. by Library of Congress for Office of Naval Research, 13 Aug. ’48. Abstract furnished by Atomic Energy Commission of article by L. Jacobson and R. Overstreet)”

Citation: 24 Medical News Letter, Vol. 12, No. 6  Friday, 10 September 1948 p. 24 https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.$b364858?urlappend=%3Bseq=210

1946 Project Crossroads Nuclear Test Film

Here is a summary of the time stamps of this video:

Project Crossroads – Nuclear Test Film (1946)
Courtesy: U.S. Department of Energy

1:50 USS independence next to the Nagato before Test Able
2:20 target ships mapped
4:14 The scientists and samples
6:00 Radio controlled drones
7:00 Manhattan project scientists at Kwajalein
9:40 dropping of the bomb
14:31 diffused cloud “dangerous radioactive particles in the air had become so diffused it was no longer a danger to the area.”
15:52 camera on bikini showing shock wave.
17:20 map of what ships got hit as they dropped the bomb off target. Independence noted
18:55 Independence seen just after explosion when the support ships entered the lagoon.
21:54 animals
24:31 Skate stating the inside were damaged, so they went inside it.
25:21 USS Independence
27:34 Baker Test, second test underwater explosion.
40:00 USS Independence

https://youtu.be/2HkLZekOZLU
Project Crossroads – Nuclear Test Film (1946)
Courtesy: U.S. Department of Energy

Continue reading “1946 Project Crossroads Nuclear Test Film”

Procedures for Decontamination of Pu From Various Surfaces, Skin

Christensen, E. L, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Procedures for Decontamination of Plutonium From Various Surfaces. Los Alamos, N.M.: Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of the University of California, 1959. pp 19-21

See Also: USNRDL-TR-256 PROTECTING AND CLEANING HANDS CONTAMINATED BY SYNTHETIC FALLOUT UNDER FIELD CONDITIONS

Aluminum, Brass, Concrete, Glass, Iron and Mild Steel, Lucite, Plexiglass and Other Acrylic Plastics, Monel, Paint, Plastics Other Than Acryiic Based Plastics, Porcelain, Rubber, Skin, Stainless Steel and Tile.

SKIN

Immediate use of a synthetic detergent-sequestrant mixture has been reported to give better decontamination than if the use of the mixture is preceded by soap and water wash. However, no temperature was given for the water used and if the water was warm enough to cause the pores to open, the decontamination solution, normally used cold, would have a difficult time removing the activity. At Los Alamos steps

19

one and two of the recommended procedure normally give sufficient decontamination.

For decontamination of hair, omit the KMnO4 treatment.

A. Recommended procedure.

1. Lather with liquid soap, using cold water, rinse thoroughly.
2. If count still remains, wash with synthetic detergent and sequestrant in a ratio of 1:2. Rinse with water.

a. Sequestrants such as:

  1. Na EDTA-
  2. Citric acid
  3. Sodium citrate
  4. Sodium tartrate
  5. Sodium phosphates
    1. b. Do not use oxalates!

C.P. Cleaner, manufactured by Finley Products, Inc., is also satisfactory. Apply as label directs.

3. If count still remains, scrub with KMnO4 crystals wet with just enough water to make thick paste. Rinse thoroughly. Repeat 5 times. Remove color with a 4% NaHSO3 solution. (Use only as a last resort.)

4. Apply TiO2 paste and rub thoroughly. Remove by swabbing. Rinse thoroughly with water.

B. Decontamination solutions in order of decreasing effectiveness.

1. TiO2 paste (expensive)
2. KMnO4 paste; color removed with 4% NaHSO3

20

3. Synthetic detergent – sequestrant
4. C.P. Cleaner or similar hand cleaner
5. 3% trisodium nitrolotriacetate – synthetic detergent
6. 3% Na citrate, ph 7.0
7. 3% Na acetate, ph 2.0
8. 3% Na tartrate, ph 7.0
9. 3% Na lactate, ph 7.0
10. 3% glycine
11. 3% Na acetate, ph 7.0
12. Water with liquid soap
13. Isotonic saline solution

USNRDL- 100 boxes of previously unknown Shipyard radiological documents – Dianne Feinstein 9-4-2004 Senate Hearings

MILITARY CONSTRUCTION APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2004 “HEARINGS BEFORE A SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS UNITED STATES SENATE ONE HUNDRED EIGHTH CONGRESS FIRST SESSION ON H.R. 2559/S. 1357 AN ACT MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2004, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

QUESTIONS SUBMITTED BY SENATOR DIANNE FEINSTEIN
NAVY
p. 84-87
HUNTERS POINT NAVAL SHIPYARD
https://hdl.handle.net/2027/pst.000051620332?urlappend=%3Bseq=90

Question. What is the Navy’s estimated cost to complete the cleanup of Hunters Point Shipyard? What is the budget for the current fiscal year and each of the next 2 fiscal years?

Answer. Cost to complete for fiscal year 2004 and out is $103.9 million. Budgets for current and next 2 fiscal years are $40.2 million in fiscal year 2003, $21.6 million in fiscal year 2004, and $1.9 million in fiscal year 2005. Budget estimates for fiscal year 2004 and fiscal year 2005 assume the receipt of land sale revenue to finance cleanup costs.

Question. Given the Navy’s recent discovery of more than 100 boxes of previously unknown Shipyard radiological documents, will the new radiological review and survey work come at the expense of other important, and budgeted, cleanup activities or will the Navy find other funds to pay for it?

Answer. Funding to pay for the expanded Historical Radiological Assessment (HRA) will not be taken from funds budgeted for cleanup at Hunters Point.

Question. Does the Navy see any remaining hurdles to moving forward with the Conveyance Agreement in the next 1–2 months?

Answer. The Navy is working diligently with the City of San Francisco to reach agreement on the Hunters Point Conveyance Agreement.  The Navy’s goal is to achieve a mutually agreeable solution to the remaining two significant issues (utilities transition plan and finalization of the deeds) within the next 1 or 2 months.

Dublin California Radiation Experiments at Camp Parks

 

Camp Parks is a Air Force Base that was previously a Navy Base used for radiation experiments in the late 50’s to mid 60’s where they purposely spread radioactive materials onto streets, yards and buildings in order to figure out how to clean up after a nuclear blast. The Navy created dirty bomb incidents all over the Bay Area and trained military personnel from all branches to clean up after a nuclear blast to remove the radiation by scrubbing, firehosing or with street sweepers etc. In the early days, the late 1940’s they thought that fallout was not dangerous, it was not until Operation Castle in 1954 when radioactive fallout fell onto Enewetak Atoll where US military personnel were stationed as well as natives and they got radiation burned from the fallout.

Camp Parks Cobalt 60 Experiments
Camp Parks was used for many radiation experiments Which I will list above when I get the articles up on the site. Fortunately in Complex III tests they decided to limit the amount of radiation they spread onto the grounds, the roads and buildings to .1R per hour which today is a nuclear accident in a nuclear power plant.

Later it would dawn on the Navy that they could use a d
ifferent colored sand and then just count the grains to figure out the amount of fallout. Continue reading “Dublin California Radiation Experiments at Camp Parks”

Treasure Island – Naval Training Bulletin. 1956-57 June p 12 Damage Controlman, Class A Courses

Schools Command, US Naval Station, Treasure Island Calif., Naval Training Bulletin. 1956-57 June p 12 HathiTrust page

1. Fire Fighting (3 weeks fire-fighting; 1 week portable pumps) 4 weeks
2. Atomic and Chemical Defense Monitoring – 3 weeks
3. Basic Woodworking Tools and General Carpentry 4 weeks
4. Welding, Mathematics, and Blueprints 4 weeks
5. Practical Damage Control 4 weeks
6. Painting and Plastic Pipe Repair 2 weeks, 2 days